Category Archives: Kristen Bell/Veronica Mars

Kristen Bell Talks to Yahoo

Kristen BellThe complete article:

Everybody needs a few basics to survive, and access to food is at the top of that list. That’s why we were to excited to talk to Kristen Bell about a campaign that could improve access to healthy food for struggling families throughout the US. It’s time to get excited about this awesome idea, because basically if Kristen is excited, we’re excited.

Thrive Market, an online food store that focuses on healthy and organic products, has started a petition to allow people to use food stamps to purchase food online. Under current US law, food stamps can’t be used online, preventing people from purchasing possibly cheaper food they need.

One of the biggest benefits to the program is that it would allow Americans living in food deserts, or places where fresh food is scarce and prices predatory, access to cheaper, healthier food. But that’s hardly the only benefit, as Kristen Bell passionately explained in our interview.

HG: We’re living in such a politically tumultuous, big headline era. Why is it also important to support smaller, focused initiatives like Thrive Market’s food stamp petition?

Kristen Bell: I think it’s very easy to become headline obsessed and not look to the smaller issues or the more complex issues, or perhaps the issues that are not on our doorstep, scaring us daily. Because those issues are the ones that are much more difficult to solve when in fact the ones that could benefit from our focus as citizens, like this particular petition, could create a lot of healthy change for a lot of people with very little effort.

HG: What drew you to put your voice behind the campaign?

KB: I’m very lucky to be able to purchase healthy foods for my family and not have to check the price. I believe that it should be the right of every American to purchase healthy food for their family. There’s not a single negative, not a single con to this campaign. It’s inarguable that everyone should be able to eat healthy food. It creates more energy during the day, kids can do their homework better, it creates less medical problems later in life…there’s nothing to argue about this campaign, it’s very cut and dry, it’s very simple, and I thought it was very deserving of a voice.

HG: What’s one important thing you think everyone should know about Thrive?

KB: That it’s a really, really simple ask with no negatives. I can’t imagine looking at any other human in the United States and them giving me a reason why the USDA should not allow food stamps to be used online.

The vast majority of people on food stamps have internet access, it would make it unbelievably easier for them to get healthy foods for their families if they were allowed to use those food stamps online….I’m so proud of the fact that a for-profit business took a stand on an issue that was important to them. I think that’s kind of the the future of this country; it’s for-profit businesses doing good.

Because she is Kristen Bell and we had gotten this far in the interview without accidentally calling her Veronica Mars, we were feeling good and wanted to know more from the incredible actress/activist (actrivist??) So we asked her about what to do if you’re feeling like your voice or your work can’t make a difference. Of course, she had something pretty awesome to share.

HG: Our site is focused on female empowerment, because so many girls are raised to believe their voices don’t matter. What would you say to women to get them more involved in charity work and activism?

KB: Read beyond the headlines, always. We have become complacent in an age of truncated headline news. Very few issues are as cut and dry as a headline, there is always more information. And yes, it’s easier just to read the headline and tweet about it and not do any extra research, but if you want to be a better person, which I believe most people do: read beyond the headlines.

Take one topic you’re interested in, whether it’s buying healthy food with food stamps, or animal welfare, or advocating for foster care kids, or more available school lunches — anything that turns your heart on, look deeper into it, because your brain does have something to offer and your voice can be heard.

Kristen also recently posted a tweet that we adored!

When we asked about it, she was kind enough to expand on what she thought the best way was to make someone who might seem like an enemy into a friend.

KB: Genuinely, with an open mind, try to understand where they’re coming from. Apply critical thinking. Critical thinking allows you to take a path where you’re, much like on the debate time, looking to understand why the other side feels the way they feel. I have to do it every day, when I hear about people who are constantly talking about the enemy, or use the word refugees in a very, very negative context, or the word immigrant… I know in my heart we’re all immigrants, I’ve seen pictures of refugees who are women and children and babies who are just looking for a place to live their lives. I’m not scared of those people, I want to help them.

But what I can understand is that people who throw those terms around negatively are very scared. I can understand when people talk about “everybody’s coming to get us” I can see in their eyes that they’re genuinely scared that people are coming to get us. So my tactic wouldn’t be to say “You’re wrong, you’re wrong, you’re wrong!” My tactic would be to show them instances of how people are not coming to get us.

Open up the conversation to points that are not as black and white as evil and good. That every human on the earth is trying to survive. And of course, there are factions that primarily deal in the currency of evil, and we can all agree on that. But the vast majority of people just want to live safe and healthy lives with their family.

Um, Kristen Bell just basically became our life guru, guys.

Thrive’s petition to allow food stamps online still needs signatures, so get signing! As a reward, here’s a video of Veron —uh, Kristen Bell, herself, in which there may or may not be a sloth impression.

Kristen Bell Writes Essay on Equality for Medium

Kristen Bell Writes Essay for Motto About Her Experience With Depression

Kristen Bell Talks About Suffering From Anxiety & Depression

Kristen Bell to Star In TV Comedy ‘Good Place’

Rachel Bilson & Kristen Bell Support No Kids Hungry

Kristen Bell Working To End Polio

Gifts For Fans of Kristen Bell & Veronica Mars

Follow @Music_IntheDark on Twitter

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Kristen Bell Covers Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell, Redbook

Kristen Bell Writes Essay for Motto About Her Experience With Depression

Kristen Bell Talks About Suffering From Anxiety & Depression

Kristen Bell to Star In TV Comedy ‘Good Place’

Rachel Bilson & Kristen Bell Support No Kids Hungry

Kristen Bell Working To End Polio

Gifts For Fans of Kristen Bell & Veronica Mars

Follow @Music_IntheDark on Twitter

Kristen Bell Writes Essay on Equality for Medium

Kristen Bell, MottoThere are many people in this great world who think women are not equal to men. And, I realize this may be a flammable opinion, but I would have to agree. My singular view through the looking glass has led me to believe that we are not the same. Should we have equal power? Yes. Should we earn equal wages? Yes. Should our voices be heard at equal volume? Hell yes.

But does X=Y, or in this case, x chromosome = y chromosome? I have to say no. There are differences — inherent and unwavering differences. For the majority of the human timeline, these differences were openly viewed as female weaknesses; creating a chasm between men and women. And though that view has been quieted, it has not disappeared. There are echoes of it everywhere you look. My question is who decided these differences were weak?

Why is being “girly” a negative adjective? Continue reading

Kristen Bell Writes Essay for Motto About Her Experience With Depression

Kristen BellWhen I was 18, my mom sat me down and said, “If there ever comes a time where you feel like a dark cloud is following you, you can get help. You can talk to me, talk to a therapist, talk to doctor. I want you to know that there are options.”

I’m so thankful for her openness on this predominantly silent subject because later, when I was in college, that time did come. I felt plagued with a negative attitude and a sense that I was permanently in the shade. I’m normally such a bubbly, positive person, and all of a sudden I stopped feeling like myself.

There was no logical reason for me to feel this way. I was at New York University, I was paying my bills on time, I had friends and ambition — but for some reason, there was something intangible dragging me down. Luckily, thanks to my mom, I knew that help was out there — and to seek it without shame.

When you try to keep things hidden, they fester and ultimately end up revealing themselves in a far more destructive way than if you approach them with honesty. I didn’t speak publicly about my struggles with mental health for the first 15 years of my career. But now I’m at a point where I don’t believe anything should be taboo. So here I am, talking to you about what I’ve experienced.

Here’s the thing: For me, depression is not sadness. It’s not having a bad day and needing a hug. It gave me a complete and utter sense of isolation and loneliness. Its debilitation was all-consuming, and it shut down my mental circuit board. I felt worthless, like I had nothing to offer, like I was a failure. Now, after seeking help, I can see that those thoughts, of course, couldn’t have been more wrong. It’s important for me to be candid about this so people in a similar situation can realize that they are not worthless and that they do have something to offer. We all do.

There is such an extreme stigma about mental health issues, and I can’t make heads or tails of why it exists. Anxiety and depression are impervious to accolades or achievements. Anyone can be affected, despite their level of success or their place on the food chain. In fact, there is a good chance you know someone who is struggling with it since nearly 20% of American adults face some form of mental illness in their lifetime. So why aren’t we talking about it?

Mental health check-ins should be as routine as going to the doctor or the dentist. After all, I’ll see the doctor if I have the sniffles. If you tell a friend that you are sick, his first response is likely, “You should get that checked out by a doctor.” Yet if you tell a friend you’re feeling depressed, he will be scared or reluctant to give you that same advice. You know what? I’m over it.

It’s a knee-jerk reaction to judge people when they’re vulnerable. But there’s nothing weak about struggling with mental illness. You’re just having a harder time living in your brain than other people. And I don’t want you to feel alone. You know what happens when I visit my doctor regarding my mental health? He listens. He doesn’t downplay my feelings or immediately hand me a pill or tell me what to do. He talks to me about my options. Because when it comes to your brain, there are a lot of different ways to help yourself.

We’re all on team human here, and let’s be honest — it’s not an easy team to be on. It’s stressful and taxing and worrisome, but it’s also fulfilling and beautiful and bright. In order for all of us to experience the full breadth of team human, we have to communicate. Talking about how you’re feeling is the first step to helping yourself. Depression is a problem that actually has so many solutions. Let’s work together to find those solutions for each other and cast some light on a dark situation.

Kristen Bell Talks About Suffering From Anxiety & Depression

Kristen Bell to Star In TV Comedy ‘Good Place’

Rachel Bilson & Kristen Bell Support No Kids Hungry

Kristen Bell Working To End Polio

Gifts For Fans of Kristen Bell & Veronica Mars

Follow @Music_IntheDark on Twitter

Kristen Bell Talks About Suffering From Anxiety & Depression

Kristen Bell, House of LiesEvery year, it’s estimated that one in five American adults cope with mental illness, according to Off Camera. This adds up to 43.8 million people. Considering that so many people deal with mental health issues, it’s important they know they’re not alone. That’s why seeing celebrities like Kristen Bell sharing their own stories matters.

“I’m extremely co-dependent,” Bell said. “I shatter a little bit when I think people don’t like me. That’s part of why I lead with kindness and I compensate by being very bubbly all the time because it really hurts my feelings when I know I’m not liked. And I know that’s not very healthy and I fight it all the time.”

Kristen explains that she was always nervous on the inside, despite being popular in school. To get people to like her, she would change who she was and alter her interests based on what her peers were passionate about. On top of this self-doubt, she also struggled with her mental health. Continue reading

Veronica Mars Rewatch Recap – Season 1 – Episode 1 – Pilot

Veronica Mars

Veronica Mars

Veronica Mars – Season 1 – Episode 1

Pilot

Notes:
As this is a rewatch, I’m using the dvd (I can’t find it on any of the streaming services, annoying!) so this first recap is of the extended version of the pilot. Also, because it’s a rewatch, there will be spoilers! Hopefully, I can get through the show before the movie comes out.
Continue reading